‘Fortunate few’ responsibilities

On Friday my youngest child began her first official steps into starting primary school. It had been a long time coming (for her!) as she’s been asking since Easter how long it would be until she could go to school. So, when her first day of ‘school transition’ finally rolled around, needless to say she was beyond excited.

Whilst she quickly and happily settled into what would be her new learning space along with a moshpit of other 4 and 5 year olds, I did pause to reflect on her good fortune. As a young girl, had she been born in any number of other countries, she would not have been entitled to an education. However, she, along with her two older sisters, have both had not just the right to attend school, but an expectation to attend, learn and then contribute back to their community.

When I studied my own family’s dynamic a little further, I also realised that my eldest child, a boy, who would have been more likely to receive an education wherever he was born may not have been as fortunate to have had the additional help he has needed. As a child with autism, what would his outlook have been if were a child in Zaatari?

So, while Friday was a milestone event for my little one and something that I am consciously aware she is lucky to be experiencing, it is also a timely reminder to remember that millions of others just like her don’t have this as their reality.

There are millions of children just like my own (and yours!) all around the world whom we don’t see. As a result, they are still growing up, but without the skills and knowledge they will need to contribute fully as adults. And, whether we like it or not, those future adults will be involved in making decisions and choices in our global community that we are all a part of.

What then?

#YesAllGirls

Food for thought.

Happy teaching.

 

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Celebrating International Day of the Girl

Today, October 11th, is the United Nation’s International Day of the Girl. For some females in first world nations, they may have the luxury of wondering why this day is even necessary? Perhaps, they are fortunate to have been treated as equals to our male counterparts and not feel that they were disadvantaged or discriminated in any way due to being a female. Or, instead, they may be one of the billions of females around the world whose future is limited in every way imaginable because they were born a girl. Their access to equal opportunities for healthcare, education, social-status, and/or political opinion is some cases non-existent, and in the worst cases, it is illegal.

However, the reality for many females who may feel that they haven’t been disadvantaged by being a female is that inequalites and stereotypes are so ingrained in our society that we don’t even notice them happening. That is where the #LikeAGirl campaign helps to demonstrate this beautifully.

This campaign was born from a desire to encourage girls to continue to participate in sports as they reach adolescence. From a global perspective, quite obviously fighting for equal access to quality education and healthcare is very clearly a top priority. However, the #LikeAGirl campaign resonated with me for a number of reasons. Firstly, it demonstrates firsthand how otherwise young, confident, first-world girls have internalised what being like a girl means. This, in turn, presumably goes on to shape their thoughts, their conversations, their opinions of self-worth, and their perceived abilities and limitations as a female in the 21st century.

So, before you write off International Day of the Girl as just another token day on the calendar OR as a day which is only meant for girls in third world countries, just take a look at the #LikeAGirl campaign and see if anything resonates with you. And, if it does, I enthusiastically encourage you to change your dialogue with the boys and girls in your classrooms (and at home) to shed some light on how we can slowly shift such ingrained, outdated, and potentially dangerous stereotypes.

Happy teaching!

A parent’s poem to their child

Hush, little one
Rest back to sleep
Your family is here to keep you safe
Just where we should be

Hush, little one
I know you’re not feeling well
Have some of your medicine
It will work quickly to stop you feeling ill

Hush, little one
I know you were afraid
But it was only a bad dream
Here you will always be safe

Hush, little one
I know that school can be hard
Your teachers are there to help you
When you need them, there they are

Ssshhh, precious child
I know you’ve seen too much
I wish I could erase your memories
And bring you peace with my gentle touch

Ssshhh, precious child
I know your little body hurts
I would give my soul in a heartbeat
To heal the wounds you didn’t deserve

Ssshhh, precious child
I know you long to learn, grow and play
One day there will be more than this for you
I just hope that it doesn’t come too late

Ssshhh, precious child
You don’t deserve this life
I had such big dreams for you
I shall try my hardest to keep them burning bright

by Kayri Shanahan

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